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Meet the Summer 2015 DiversityAbroad.com Scholarship Winners/Video Bloggers

Posted By Erica Ledesma, Friday, May 8, 2015
Updated: Thursday, July 28, 2016

Diversity Abroad is happy to announce the winners of our DiversityAbroad.com and Diversity Abroad Network Scholarships. Each year, we aim to help meet the needs of students from diverse academic, economic, ethnic, and social backgrounds. Many thanks to our partners CEA Study Abroad and the Intern Group for their partnership and support in making international opportunities possible for these students.

Please join us in congratulating the following students and supporters:

Diversity Abroad Network $500 Summer Scholarship 
for students at Network Member Institutions
(Name, Major, University, Study Abroad Country)
Ashley Young, Broadcast Communications, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, India
Ardilla Deneys, Interior Design, Virginia Commonwealth University, Denmark
Sarah Swaney, Early Childhood Education, University of Georgia, Costa Rica
Estrella Quiroz, Public Relations, University of Florida, Italy
Jamie Pearson, Special Education, University of Illinois, Australia

CEA & Diversity Abroad $1,000 Scholarship
(Name, Major, University, Study Abroad Country)
Tatiana Gheybi, Human Biology, UC San Diego, France
Julianne Capati, Marketing, University of Arizona, Czech Republic

The Intern Group Diversity Abroad Full Summer Internship Scholarship 
This full scholarship covers the full cost of participating in an internship this summer in Medellin, Colombia (including transportation, housing, and tuition)
Luis Sosa, Double Major: Diplomacy & International Relations + Latin American Studies, City Hall University, Colombia

Our scholarship recipients will be blogging about their experience and sharing photos and videos on the DiversityAbroad.com blog. Check out their first posts to see what their biggest concerns are as they prepare for their upcoming semester abroad experiences by visiting the blog at blog.diversityabroad.com.

We hope to see more of your students applying for future scholarships with Diversity Abroad! To learn more about our scholarships, please visit http://diversityabroad.com/study-abroad-scholarships.

Tags:  Education Abroad Diversity  Funding  Scholarships  Study Abroad 

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5 Students Awarded Scholarships to Study Abroad This Summer

Posted By Administration, Saturday, May 17, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Each year, the Diversity Network awards students attending our member institutions scholarships to support their study abroad experience. We are excited to announce that we were able to award five $500 scholarships to students from five of our Network Institutions. Not only do our scholars represent a diversity of institutions, majors, and class standings, their destinations are equally varied.

 

2013 Diversity Network Summer Scholarship Recipients

Michael Nguyen, Film & Media Arts, Temple University, China

Vanessa Murray, Music, University of Georgia, Costa Rica

Isaac Anguiano, Finance, Michigan State University, Germany

Dyan Castro, Architecture, University of Michigan, Japan

Kimberly Knight, Psychology, UC San Diego, France


The quality of submissions we received this year was exceptionally high and made selecting this year’s awardees particularly challenging. Applicants were asked to submit videos responding to the question “How will international study and travel prepare you for the future?”

Each of these students will be blogging about their experience and sharing photos and videos on DiversityAbroad.com. We hope to see more of your students applying for future scholarships with Diversity Abroad! You can follow the students’ blogs at Blogs.DiversityAbroad.com/. 

Eligibility for the Diversity Network Scholarship is just one of the many benefits of becoming a Diversity Network member. To learn more and to join us as we advance diversity and equity in international education, please visit us on the web at https://diversitynetwork.site-ym.com/page/joinus.

Tags:  Funding  Scholarships  study abroad 

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More Scholarships Is Not the Answer

Posted By Andrew Gordon, Friday, September 30, 2011
Updated: Thursday, July 21, 2016

Why don’t more ethnically and racially diverse students study abroad? This is a common question asked among international educators. For too long the response has been that lack of funding is the main reason why these diverse students don’t study abroad. Unfortunately the idea that funding is the main reason why underrepresented students don’t pursue education abroad has masked other systemic issues that contribute to dismal participation in study abroad programs by diverse student groups.

First, let me be clear, I am not by any means against more scholarships for study abroad. In fact, even though Diversity Abroad is not a scholarship granting organization, we’ve had the opportunity to award thousands of dollars in scholarship funds for underserved students. We are always looking for opportunities to offer more. We applaud the many successful scholarship programs administered by providers, institutions and NGO’s that help to fund study abroad. These programs have helped send thousands of underserved students abroad. Scholarships, however, are effective tools for students who are already considering study abroad. What about the thousands of students who feel study abroad is not for them? Will more scholarships help convince these students to study abroad? If students fail to see how they fit into the activity that the scholarship is associated with, in this case study abroad, the scholarship monies will not be a motivating factor in pursuing this facet of their education. Scholarships by themselves will not drastically change the demographic of the study abroad student if they aren’t coupled with targeted outreach that demonstrates the educational, personal and professional benefits of education abroad for diverse students.

Underrepresented students need to see how study abroad applies to them. It’s essential that in addition to scholarships we evaluate how we articulate to under-served students and their families what study abroad is, as well as its present and long term benefits. We all do well to ask ourselves if the messages we send through our printed materials and online about who studies abroad and the benefits thereof are attracting or discouraging underrepresented students from pursuing these opportunities.

Scholarships are important and essential to expanding study abroad. However, scholarships will only do so much without targeted outreach to help underserved students and their families understand and appreciate the value of education abroad. We may not be able to give money to help our students study abroad, however I challenge all of us to look for opportunities at our institutions and organizations to promote study abroad and its immense benefits to a more diverse population of students. I’m confident that with a collective effort to reach out to a more diverse student population we will see wider participation in education abroad among traditionally underrepresented groups.

Andrew Gordon is the founder and president of Diversity Abroad. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco, where he studied business, economics and Spanish. He has studied, traveled and worked throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle East and South America. He started Diversity Abroad in 2006 with the focus of increasing global awareness and engagement among students and young people with an emphasis on diverse and under-served populations.

Tags:  Diversity Abroad Conference  education abroad  Minority Students  Scholarships  Study Abroad 

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Funding for International Education: Why It's Important

Posted By Lily Lopez-McGee, Wednesday, November 3, 2010
Updated: Thursday, July 21, 2016

With tuition rates on the rise and budget cuts to nearly all areas of spending in higher education, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that international education programming support has come under increased criticism and funding is at a serious risk of being reduced. Some political candidates have even stated publicly their intent to cut spending in the some “75 internationally focused programs that fall under the U.S, Department of State and U.S. Department of Education”. If nothing else has, this recent attack should mobilize professionals in the field to effectively communicate the importance of international education programming to the general public while ensuring that current support is being used effectively.

If we are to effectively defend against current threats to international education spending cuts, though, we must first take a serious look at the source driving criticism. We must face the reality that we are experiencing one of the worst economic crises since the Great Depression.This crise has been felt in all sectors of society and many of our offices have already experienced cuts to staff, budget, travel, etc.However despite this reality we must also remind ourselves and others that we have an economy that is inextricably connected to global markets. That means we have to develop and train language -proficient, culturally competent professionals. Furthermore, we should better champion the message that proclaims the current funding for international education programs is crucial to maintaining the U.S. economic strength and security.

There are certainly people who will be skeptical in hearing this message, however it is clear that if we don't fund opportunities that prepare U.S. students to be competitive in the global market, other nations will look to fill that void. There are 670,000 international students from across the globe studying at our institutions of higher learning in the U.S. alone. This number far exceeds the 260,000 U.S. students we send abroad annually (IIE 2009 Open Doors Report), a figure that clearly indicates the need to expand opportunities for students to go abroad.

As a nation, we need to encourage students to pursue language and study abroad that will prepare them for a globally-competitive job market. The current Open Doors figures highlight that we must also place particular focus on expanding these opportunities to underrepresented student groups. As a field, international education should not only expand how many students we send abroad, but also widen the types of students who have access to international opportunities. There is a vital need to send students abroad who represent the diversity reflected in our nation, and now is certainly not the time to reduce funding that currently supports those initiatives (ex. Gilman ScholarshipRangel Fellowship, and Institute for International Public Policy Fellowship).

After we have spread the message of why funding for international education programming is important, next we have to re-examine how we are utilizing the current support we receive.

Similarly, to justify that the current spending is meaningful in these tough economic times, we need to make sure current funding is working efficiently and demonstrates that students are benefiting academically, socially and professionally from these programs. We need to provide concrete evidence, in the form of program analysis that highlight the real impact of these programs. Programs should be evaluated in a meaningful way that holds faculty and providers accountable for the successes and shortcomings of their programs, and not simply to produce data. If we are to protect the future of international education funding, we must take the necessary, sometimes difficult, steps to ensure that every dollar spent on such programs is effectively being used.

International education is critical to developing the next generation of leaders, and we as international educators need to support initiatives that protect current spending while promoting innovative approaches to attracting more public and private support in these areas.

Lily Lopez-McGee currently serves as Program Manager with the UNCF Special Programs Corporation in the Institute for International Public Policy division. Among her many duties, Ms. Lopez-McGee manages student internships, language institutes and social media outreach.  She is fluent in Spanish and has traveled through parts of Latin America and Western Europe. She is a graduate of the University of Washington Evans School for Public Affairs, where she earned her Master's of Public Administration.

Tags:  career  Funding  global education  International Exchange  Outreach  professional skills  Resources  Scholarships 

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