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Global Student Leadership Summit Alumni Profile: Carmeisha Huckleby

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 19, 2016

GSLS Alumni Profile: Carmeisha Huckleby

Where do you call home?

Detroit, MI

Where are you currently living?

Albany, NY
  

Where did you go to school for undergraduate/graduate studies?  

Michigan State University 
 

Please describe your current career/educational endeavors. Where are you currently employed/studying? What are your future plans?

I'm currently a study abroad program coordinator at the University at Albany SUNY 

Please describe your past international experiences. How have these experiences impacted your current career/personal goals?

I've studied abroad in Japan, but have also visited Dubai, Egypt, Ghana, Abu Dhabi, China, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Taiwan, and Canada. These experiences prepared me for my current position by helping me gain intercultural competence, teaching me about the challenges people face while abroad, and showing me how much personal growth can happen while abroad. I am excited to be able to share these experiences with my students. 

When did you attend the GSLS?

I attended the conference in New Orleans in 2015.
 

Please describe how your experience at GSLS has impacted your current professional path. 

Attending the conference not only gave me the chance to meet professionals in the field and network with them, but it also provided me with the opportunity to improve my presentation skills. 

What advice would you give to college students about taking advantage of international travel?

In a globalized society, taking advantage of international travel is very important because it prepares you for diversity within the workforce, helps you gain cultural understanding and patience, and is a great opportunity for personal growth. 

Tags:  education abroad  global education  Global Student Leadership Summit  professional skills 

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Professional Development Opportunities to Learn More about Advising and Diversity

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 15, 2015
Updated: Thursday, July 28, 2016

As we aim to increase access, inclusion, and diversity in international education, professional development is critical. Our offices and organizations can only be as successful as the level of training that has been provided to our staff who are directly supporting and indirectly impacting the students we serve. To this end, it is important that we begin to identify professional development opportunities to assist us in these endeavors. Although international education conferences are able to briefly touch on subjects of diversity and advising, the wide variety of topics that are discussed do not leave a lot of room for deep exploration of these specific areas.

Here are five conferences (in addition to the Annual Diversity Abroad Conference) to consider adding to your professional development plan to enhance your knowledge of diversity and advising in higher education.

NACADA Annual & Regional Conferences
NACADA is the Global Community for Academic Advising and is focused on building skills, knowledge, and awareness around topics of academic advising. Most study abroad advisors don’t view themselves as academic advisors, which can feel like a disconnect for the student. Consider attending this year’s NACADA conference, themed “What happens in advising, stays with students” to gain theoretical insight and practical tools for advising.
Annual conference typically held in October (though state drive-ins and regional meetings are held throughout the year)

NCORE - National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education
NCORE is a great opportunity to explore issues of race and ethnicity in American Higher Education. With sessions like “Stereotype Threat: A Threat in the Air, Mind and Body,” “Exploring How Faculty in Higher Education Respond to an Assessment of their Intercultural Competence,” and “How to Have Successful Classroom Discussions on Diversity Issues,” it’s clear that this conference can benefit everyone working to improve access, inclusion and diversity in international education from pre-departure to on-site and reentry.
Typically held in May

National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE) Annual Conference
Although NADOHE is geared toward campus diversity officers, the rich discussion can also benefit those of us working in areas of diversity in international education. This year’s theme was “Getting It Done: Rising to Opportunities and Challenges in Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education.”
Typically held in March

Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA) Annual Conference
Although some study abroad offices consider themselves an academic unit and not as part of student services, there is a lot to be learned from the student engagement of student services professionals on our campuses. Since we are all interested in a common goal of crafting a valuable and enriching student experience, NASPA may be an opportunity to connect with your colleagues who work across campus and better understand their practices and learn from their experiences.
Typically held in March

Association for Orientation, Transition, & Retention in Higher Education NODA Annual Conference
NODA can provide insight into one of the key components of serving our diverse students well - preparation and orientation. With topics like “Online Orientation Trends: How To Measure Learning Outcomes & Assess Program Success”, this is sure to be a valuable event for the person responsible for orientation programming.
Typically held in late October/November (regular online learning and regional state workshops are held throughout the year)

We hope that you will consider adding one of these conferences to your professional development plan this year. There are many more conferences in higher education that can help you build knowledge, skills and awareness around topics of advising and diversity. This is certainly not an exhaustive list, but hopefully this gives you somewhere to start. Have you participated in other conferences outside of international education that have been valuable? Which conferences would you add to this list?

Tags:  advising  diversity  Diversity Abroad Conference  professional development  professional skills 

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Making the Most of Your Diversity Abroad Conference Experience

Posted By Administration, Friday, March 13, 2015
Updated: Thursday, July 28, 2016

Attending conferences can, on the surface, seem like time that you could be spending doing more productive activities in the office. More than just an opportunity to present about your work or connect with colleagues you haven’t seen in a while, conferences can also serve as incubators for new ideas and spaces for like-minded individuals to motivate and energize each other to make change happen on their campus.

The Diversity Abroad Conference is a venue that not only allows higher education professionals to connect with their colleagues in different offices and campuses, it’s a space for people to discuss ideas that often have a way of making it to the sidelines during regular operating hours. Let’s face it, diversity and inclusion in international education or international education in diversity and inclusion efforts aren’t often at the center of the agenda for most offices. In many cases, the convergence of these topics happens only a handful of times throughout the academic year. For this reason (among others) we are excited that for 2.5 days we’ll get to bring these topics to the center of our focus and create actionable plans for how we can all enhance diversity and inclusion efforts in international education.

We’ve pulled together a short list (here’s a more comprehensive list if you’re interested) of ways that can help ensure you gain the most from these 2.5 days of intense dialogue, interactive sessions, and thought-provoking discussion.

Tags:  Diversity Abroad Conference  professional skills 

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Moving Beyond Barriers: What if we stopped talking about what’s wrong?

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Updated: Wednesday, July 27, 2016

At the latest CIEE conference, Diversity Abroad staff teamed up with local universities to host a workshop titled “Breaking Our Own Barriers: Becoming An Accessible Study Abroad Office.” Unlike most presentations on barriers, we decided not to look at the traditionally accepted 4 F’s which focus on barriers from the diverse student perspective. Instead, we took this as an opportunity to look inwardly, and identify what barriers we may have knowingly or unknowingly put in place that keep students from taking advantage of international opportunities. From staffing and organizational structure, to advising, outreach, and applications, the room of over 100+ study abroad practitioners identified many issues that we have put in place ourselves that may be hindering the very students we want to encourage. Many times, the policies (or lack thereof) are related to organizational habits - doing things the way we’ve always done them because that’s the way they’ve always been done. At other times, the policies came about to make our lives easier without much consideration for the student (morning office hours or information sessions).

After sitting in on a session that is focused on barriers, or everything that’s wrong, it’s easy to get discouraged.  We talk so much about barriers as an industry and try to attack those barriers, but participation rates mostly stay the same. So how can we change the approach? If we’re not going to focus on the negative barriers, what are we going to focus on? Let’s turn our attention to the appreciative inquiry method, as described by Sue Hammond in The Thin Book of Appreciative Inquiry:

“The traditional approach to change is to look for the problem, do a diagnosis, and find a solution. The primary focus is on what is wrong or broken; since we look for problems, we find them. By paying attention to problems, we emphasize and amplify them… Appreciative Inquiry suggests that we look for what works in an organization. The tangible result of the inquiry process is a series of statements that describe where the organization wants to be, based on the high moments of where they have been. Because the statements are grounded in real experience and history, people know how to repeat their success.”

So how can we, as a field, move beyond a conversation focused on the problem, or barriers? How can we identify our strengths, the strengths of our staff, the strengths of other campus partners, and the strengths of our colleagues around the field to shift our focus and build towards a shared vision for international education? Let’s first learn to appreciate that the barriers can be challenges, but not focus all of our attention on them. The appreciative inquiry approach can help us move past these barriers and have open conversations about what is working well to create transformational change. To learn more about appreciative inquiry and find tools you can use in your organization, you can visit any of the appreciative inquiry centers found online including Appreciative Inquiry Commons, The Center for Appreciative Inquiry, and Mind Tools: Appreciative Inquiry.

Image credit: http://layservantministries.blogspot.com/ 

Tags:  Education Abroad Diversity  inclusion  Outreach  professional skills 

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Having the Right Skills

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, September 4, 2012
Updated: Thursday, July 21, 2016

International education is increasingly becoming the primary means by which societies will bridge the cultural and linguistic divides not only in the United States, but globally. With the challenges shared by societies being global and interdisciplinary in nature, and so too are the solutions.  The world demands a competent workforce able to integrate, and thrive in different societies through experience.  To achieve this demand, professionals in education must overcome the issue of lacking awareness of an international education in every class room and campus. Lack of knowledge in the opportunities to learn about and experience other cultures stifles the abilities of this generation to embrace the world of tomorrow.

On May 2012, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Secretary-General Angel Gurría stated that skills have become the global currency of the 21st century. Without proper investment in skills, people languish in the margins of society where technological progress does not translate to economic growth, and the countries can no longer compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society. A globally influenced education allows students to cultivate and harness a unique set of skills to compete globally.  It calls on educators to uphold the highest educational standard, challenging growing leaders by instilling best practices of disciplined learning, consistency in excellence and appreciation for the diversity we all embrace.

This is no easy task. What should all U.S. students be expected to know and understand about the world? What skills and attributes will students need to confront future problems, which will be global in scope? What do scholars from international relations disciplines and experienced practitioners of global education believe students should know and how can these insights be best incorporated into existing standards? For those who have studied abroad or had any resident international experience, how can those lessons learned and experience be harnessed and reinforced as students return to their respective home, professional and professional communities?  The solution includes but by any means is not limited to duties of professionals in education across disciplines to:

  • Increasing capacities of schools and colleges by improving access to high-quality international educational experiences by integrate internationally focused courses within the current learning curriculum.
  • Increasing the number and diversity of students who study and intern abroad and encouraging students and institutions to choose nontraditional study-abroad locations.
  • Help under-represented U.S. institutions offer and promote study-abroad opportunities for their students
  • Actively promote study abroad and encourage students, teachers, and citizens at all levels to study within the U.S. and vise a versa

We must be aware of the opportunities in order to take advantage and utilize them to maximum capacity by introducing international relations, languages and cultural studies to the classroom and reinforcing that teaching with firsthand experience through study, volunteering and teaching abroad.  Enhancing the abilities and skillsets of a generation of individuals to dispel preconceived notions about any culture and society, effectively communicate and appreciate diversity moves this generation closer to tackling global challenges. 

The Diversity Network sends its sincere thanks and appreciation to Zubida Bahkeit for sharing her thoughts on the most pressing issue facing international education today.  If you would like to share your thoughts, email us at members@diversitynetwork.org.

Tags:  Diversity  education abroad  global education  inclusion  International Exchange  language  professional skills  research  underrepresented students 

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